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recommended bed in america. >>> new nuclear fears in japan. officials say a partial meltdown is likely happening now and multiple meltdowns are a real possibility. >>> unbelievable amateur video at the moment the tsunami hit. water pouring in, flooding cars and everything in its way in miyako, japan. more amazing pictures next. hi, everybody. great to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. this is the continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. it's 12 noon in the east and 2:00 a.m. monday in japan. three major stories developing now in that country. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he says the earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, workers at a nuclear power plant hit by the earthquake and tsunami are trying to keep temps down to prevent the disaster from grewing worse. the escalating crisis includes the threat of multiple meltdowns. >>> more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people tested positive for high ra
territories. >> president obama echoes the message of calm for the american people and support for japan. but did he wait too long? >> president obama's under fire for sticking to his schedule. is he showing admirable discipline, or is it looking like a failure of leadership? >> especially with the espn picks. >> contribute to help the people who have been devastated in japan. >> i was impressed with his picks and his knowledge of players, but that wasn't what the american people needed to see yesterday. >> yesterday president obama called japan's prime minister to discuss the crisis. >> we've got a president who on top of this knows he's got to turn this economy around. >> in some ways the president just can't -- you can't win sometimes. >> the japanese government's credibility continues to sink by the day. >> two very different pieces of advice between the u.s. government and the japanese government -- >> american leaders may be saying what japanese citizens are not hearing. >> there's a tradition in japan of sort of toning down bad news. >> who's in charge of this response effort? is
that hit japan nine hours ago causing a deadly tsumani that generated a massive wall of water. buildings and homes and anything in its path including people and likely hilling hundreds as we look at the latest. office buildings also rattled to the core and the images residents posted on you tube and twitter. we have that and the latest from the ground in japan and how the military is mobilizing to help. more pictures coming in that are absolutely unbelievable. they tell the entire story. look at this water. we had to show you once again, it's creating something that looks like a giant whirlpool. this swirling vortex almost looks fake. this boat looks like a toy. maybe 500 feet wide. check out the explosion. you are watching a natural gas storage tank burning. thousands of cubic meters of gas exploding looking like a fireball. the flame were reported to be 100 feet high. thousands of people are on the streets in tokyo. trains aren't running. no public transportation. it is nightfall and people are stranded. this is what they were doing, wondering where to go next, stuck in tokyo. hundreds
't forget there are enormous numbers of earthquakes in japan. people are not completely terrified every time there is an earthquake. it happens a lot. it's just that this earthquake was one of the most powerful ones ever recorded. one of the interesting things when you get back to the nuclear power plants, thomas, is the nuclear power plants were designed to with stand earthquakes that were five times less powerful than the one that hit them. they weren't designed to sustain a tsunami at the same time. you have to ask was the planning correct here? that's easier in hindsight, but was it correct in terms of safety measures. >> bob, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> the situation with japan's nuclear reactor brings to mind for a lot of people the 1986 chernobyl disaster in russia and 1979's three mile island disaster in pennsylvania. joining me on the phone is dick thornburg who was governor of pennsylvania during the three mile island crisis. what has been going through your head as you watch the events unfolding in japan and the talk and fear about the nuclear reactors there? >> there
of miyagi prefecture as well. some towns in japan are running out of coffins and body bags. one town was completely flattened, among the dead people who could not get out of their hospital beds. 1700 residents still missing. but in the middle of all of this destruction, an amazing rescue. an elderly man alive. he was found alive and he survived three days under rubble in miyagi, japan. rescuers scaried him out today. msnbc's chris jansing has made her way to tokyo, there live for us. chris, what are you seeing? >> reporter: well, i have to tell you, when you see that video of the one man being rescued you see there are a few glimmers of hope here. but they are indeed few and far between. the scenes have been absolutely unrelenting devastation. 1,000 bodies, as you said, washing up on one shoreline. they had been washed into the sea bi-the huge waves of the tsunami and are now coming back up. and in town after town after town in the northeast we are seeing millions of people who are about to spend their fourth night, it's 11:00 p.m. here in japan, without heat, without electricity, an
to sergeant david pearson at narita, in narita, japan. are you at the airport? >> caller: yes, i'm at the airport as we speak. >> were you there four hours ago when it hit? >>. >> caller: yes, i was. i saw the lockers shaking back and forth violently. by the look on people's faces, i could see there was an earthquake. we were called into formation. there would be a tsunami coming, we would be regrouping and move further south to evacuate the country. >> narita, is that on the west coast of the main island? >> caller: that's correct. yes. >> at this moment, have you seen any sort of tsunami wave action on the west coast? the wave action can wraparound islands as we saw during the tsunami in the 2000s. have you seen any tsunami wave action there? >> caller: i have not seen anything myself. i have not been by the windows. >> thank you very much. we appreciate you for stopping by today. watch at what is happening here in tokyo. some of the waves here moving through. if you have flown over japan, what you will see at narita airport or any of the airports in parts of tokyo or up and do
the humanitarian missions nevertheless will continue. >>> high anxiety. japan pulls emergency workers from its crippled nuclear power plant after surging radiation. dealing with disaster, a new study reveals how prepare suicide the u.s. to deal with the major nuclear emergency. and wave of power -- newly surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits the oregon coastline. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with melting point. a skeleton crew working to prevent an all-out meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant were forced out of the facility for nearly an hour today. the extremely rare measure was called for following a dangerous spike in radiation that japanese authorities feared was a risk to workers' lives. dan shenman reports. >> reporter: authorities in japan have struggled to avert an environmental catastrophe in the plant in tokyo. the rods were being stored in pools of water. seawater has been pumped into reactors one, two, and three to cool fuel rods as they worked to br
, it's "meet the press." >>> wall of destruction, the death toll soars from japan's twin disasters as authorities race to head off nuclear meltdowns. >>> shock waves, the situation in japan raises fears over the safety of nuclear power plants here at home. >>> and whiteout, a late winter blizzard leaves hundreds of motorists stranded in north dakota. >>> good morning, those stories and more straight ahead, this is first look on msnbc. >>> and we begin this morning with a country in crisis, in japan this morning, rescuers are searching for signs of life beneath the rubble as the clock ticks in the wake of friday's epic disaster. japanese please say they've recovered another 1,000 bodies that washed ashore along the miyagi coast, rising a mounting death toll that is believed to be above 10,000, nbc's kristen dahlgren joins us from tokyo with more. >> reporter: there have been more than 300 aftershocks registered here there were new warnings today. and now growing concerns over the possibility of a nuclear accident. with heavy equipment, and bare hands, rescue workers continue the des
for fitting us in. >>> and more on the disaster in japan straight ahead on "the daily rundown" with chuck and savannah, right now. >>> overnight, japan is reeling after the largest earthquake in its recorded history. it now pushes a tsunami across its shores and reports of several hundred are killed as the water sweeps away ships, vehicles, buildings, sparking fires, devastating coastal communities, and even threatening some nuclear plants over there. meanwhile, on this side of the pacific, waves are blanketing things, it's hitting hawaii this past hour and the west coast is now bracing for an impact later this morning. we have live reports. and we're going to hear from fema director right here ondale rundo daily rundown. >> let's get to the rundown. we will start with the breaking news out of japan. a catastrophic 8.9 earthquake in japan today. the largest earthquake in japan's recorded history. the latest death poll, the ap is reporting japanese police saying 200 to 300 bodies have been found in the northeastern coastal area. the quake sent tsunami waves barreling across the pacific, co
>>> on our broadcast tonight, the big one hits japan. a massive history-making earthquake, one of the largest ever measured, and it triggers a massive tsunami all the way to the u.s. tonight we're watching the rising death toll. a nuclear plant in trouble. the aftershocks continue. the world is watching japan and our coverage begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >> a special good evening to our viewers in the west tonight. as you know by now, the nation of japan has suffered a colossal historic earthquake that has caused massive damage, massive loss of life and sent ocean waters racing over land. the big quake was a magnitude 8.9, it struck at 2:46 p.m., centered 78 miles offshore. while tokyo swayed and shook and bounced for minutes on end, sending millions to shelter, sendai was the closest population center. it has been devastated. the loss of life officially so far in the hundreds will almost certainly be thousands, as thousands are missing. the quake then triggered a tsunami, water upwards of 30 feet high that swamped the japanese shoreline, moving fas
authorizing all necessary measures. we'll have that coming up. three reactors with partial meltdowns in japan and the desperate attempt to stop the worst from happening. and there is breaking news at this hour. the united nations security council has voted to allow the u.n.'s member nations to take military action against libya. the vote opens the door for the united states to begin air strikes against libya at any time. the "new york times" reporting u.s. officials in the obama administration began to believe a no fly zone by itself would make no difference. these officials, "the times" reporting says began pushing for what's called a no drive zone, specifically the use of u.s. military air strikes to cut down gadhafi's ground forces to tanks and heavy artillery. the u.s. push for tonight's vote on the security council. the resolution approved 10-0 with five countries abstaining says that the u.n., quote, will take all necessary measures to protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack in libya including bin ghazi. if you're worried about u.s. ground forces going into
on the ground say these are the strongest that they have felt in days. the disaster in japan is reaching new levels escalating to what very likely could become a potential nuclear crisis. radiation from nuclear facilities is spreading after another explosion even japan's prime minister admitted there is a high risk of further leaking, but they insit right now that people should not panic and that the risk to citizens is still, to use their language, very low. some of the saddest images coming out of the town of minami-sanriku where the water poured into a hospital that now looks a lot more like a morgue. a nurse explained the water simply took everyone. 10,000 are feared dead across japan as a result of this the awful disaster. we do want to the focus on some of the hope, as well. five days after the quake and the tsunami, there still are amazing rescues taking place. some of them within the last several hours. today, both a man and woman survivors, and obviously the faces of hope, as well. >>> chris jansing, the host of this program "jansing and company" is in tokyo where she's following th
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
>>> japan's triple tragedy. gruesome discoveries and multiple meltdowns now alarmingly possible. what can japan do to prevent a potential nuclear catastrophe? >>> coming up, the latest on the disaster in japan. plus, new stunning video of the tsunami's sudden fury. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. it's just past 11:00 a.m. eastern. 8:00 a.m. out west. we have three major stories developing in japan. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he said earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, the japanese government is warning that another hydrogen explosion could happen at a nuclear power plant reactor. workers now pumping sea water into the reactor to prevent a meltdown. more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12 mile radius around the nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people have tested positive for high radiation levels on their skin and clothing. let's go live again to our london bureau where nbc is keeping track of all the latest developments. >> good morning, alex. it'
in the se sendai area. magnitude 8.4. one of the largest earthquakes ever to hit japan. major earthquake hit japan on friday afternoon. the quake measured magnitude 8.4. agency has issued a tsunami warning for japan's pacific coast. but as you can see, live coverage of miyagi prefecture area. tsunami waves of over four meters were observed soon after the quake. the agency is warning that tsunami could reach between 6 and 10 meters. tsunamis come in several waves. for those of you who are listening to this program, if you're along the coast, please do stay away, and move to higher ground immediately. you're seeing live coverage of miyagi prefecture in the sendai area. the quake, 8.4, from 7.9. one of the worst earthquakes ever in japanese history. it's a 7 on the japanese seismic scale of 0 to 7. that is the same size earthquake as the one that hit the great honshu area in 1995. fires breaking out as you can see. live coverage -- >> welcome back, everyone. lynn berry here in new york. if you're just tuning on the east coast, 4:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. local time in tokyo, japan, where we are bringi
. and fears of a nuclear meltdown in japan after an explosion blows out the walls of a building. housing a reactor. this comes as one report out of japan says almost 10,000 people are unaccounted for in one northeast port town. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. within this hour we have more alarming news from japan. japanese public broadcaster nhk is reporting at least 9,500 people are unaccounted for in one port town. officially the death toll is at 574 across japan. however, powerful aftershocks continue to shake the region. for is your vooifrps stranded in the hardest hit areas help is on the way as today the first wave of 50 thousand troops has begun arriving by boats and helicopters to those areas. an explosion at one of japan's nuclear power stations explosion you see right there on your screen, it has destroyed a building that houses a reactor. officials are saying that the radiation levels actually have been decreasing. the tsunami caused it to lose its cooling system and it is raising fears of a meltdown. let's go live now once again to tokyo and to nbc's ian williams. firs
in japan after an explosion at a nuclear power plant. it happened just a few hours ago. there is a desperate race against the clock as officials try to prevent that reactor from melting down. >>> two of japan's nuclear power plants are in a perilous situation now. there are 11 kilometers apart and on japan's eastern coast. both severely damaged by that 8.9 quake that hit the country on friday. >>> meanwhile, another breaking story to tell you about at this hour. take a look at this. a tour bus accident on i-95 in. bronx here in new york. the new york fire department has just confirmed at least 12 people are dead. as you can see, dozens of firefighters and police are there. a frightening scene. it appears this bus tipped over and the top of it slid through one of the posts that holds freeway signs. it appears to be a tour bus ever some kind. trying to learn more about this. as we get more information we'll bring that to you. so a very good morning to you. i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc saturday." we'll have more on the bus crash as it becomes available. >>> our other b
yesterday who is writing about that. >> no doubt about it. first, obviously, the big news out of japan. we why don't we get the latest. >> we are talking about the fifth strongest earthquake on record since 1900. hawaii and other parts of the pacific are bracing for a destructive tsunami triggered by an 8.9 earthquake out of japan. it shows a massive 23-foot wall of watter that swept boats, cars, buildings and tons of debris inland. 32 people have now died in the quake. a figure that is expected to rise. a tsunami warning is now in place for the entire u.s. west coast. that means coastal communities in washington, oregon, california and southern alaska should be on alert and prepared for possible evacuation. a warning is also in place for hawaii, which was struck by a smaller 4.5 earthquake earlier today. now, there are no immediate reports of injuries or damage in hawaii but the state is bracing for the first waves from the tsunami which are expected to hit at 8:00 a.m. eastern time this morning. now, ahead of that, tsunami sirens were sounded and coastal areas are being evacuated. fires
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
will keep you posted as we learn more details in this continuing, developing story. >>> on the verge. japan's nuclear crisis creeps toward catastrophe as a third reactor is rocked by an explosion and a fourth catches fire. >>> nikkei nose-dive. japanese stocks go into a freefall with investors panicked by radiation fears. >>> and sticker shock. russia jacks up the price of flying american astronauts into space. good morning, everyone, i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with a nuclear nightmare. radiation levels spiked in japan this year in the wake of a series of explosions at the fukushima nuclear power plant just days after suffering its most crippling catastrophe ever. japan is now facing the world's worst nuclear disaster since chernobyl. for the latest we turn to kristen dahlgren in tokyo. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. the latest radiation levels appear to have leveled off some, but a spike earlier had us talking about levels that could affect human health, so there is great concern here i
rundown." we will see you tomorrow. >>> and the nuclear crisis in japan worsens following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. high levels of radiation force 140,000 people indoors. could it happen here with a powerful earthquake off the west coast said to be overdue? we will talk to the head of california's emergency management agency. >>> and then there's libya. gadhafi's forces take the last rebel-held town west of tripoli, increasing pressure on the west to intervene. monday, secretary clinton met with opposition leaders. clinton is saturday seth to land in cairo he this hour. andrea mitchell traveling with her it is tuesday, march 15th, the ides of march. savannah is on assignment. the japan crisis weighs on the world market that at the opening bell. and saudi forces have entered bahrain there is a budget vote on capitol hill there is a fight on the right over sarah palin and general david petraeus testifies on afghanistan. that's all happening today. let's get to the run down but begin with japan and the nuclear crisis there a third explosion in four days at th
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
. leading off tonight, japanese meltdown. the country of japan is confronting a grim reality three days after the massive earthquake and tsunami. thousands of bodies are washing up on the shore and the death toll is likely to go over 10,000 dead. and for many who survived the catastrophe, there's no power, no running water, and very little food. the disaster in japan is threefold. humanitarian and economic, but also nuclear. after several explosions at a nuclear reactor increased the threat of meltdown. we'll get the latest from the earthquake zone at the top of the show. plus, the nuclear crisis. can meltdown be avoided? what meltdown fears in japan mean for nuclear energy here in america. and later, the relief effort, overwhelming in a country that hasn't seen this level of hardship since world war ii. we begin with alex thompson of britain's channel 4. he joins us from sendai, japan. alex, tell us what you've seen over there. it's quite dramatic. >> reporter: i've covered disasters around the world and wars for 22 years. i've never seen anything quite on the scale of this. let me giv
and worsening nuclear crisis in japan. another explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear power plant that is about 170 miles north of tokyo. and it is now feared a third reactor will explode. officials say fuel rods appear to be melting right now in all three troubled reactors. all of this, of course, raising concerns more radiation will be released. the u.s. military moves some of its fleet further from japan's shore after some of the uss ronald reagan carrier group were exposed to a cloud of low-level radiation, this as authorities try to cope with the disaster. officials say another 1,000 bodies washed up today along japan's earthquake and tsunami ravaged northeast coast. so far 2,800 people confirmed dead. but as you well know by now, the final death toll is expected to increase to as many as possibly 10,000 the people. chris jansing joins us live from tokyo regarding the nuclear crisis. at the top of the hour i pointed out a japanese official is saying we are likely seeing melting at the plant that's been so much focused on. >> reporter: what we've had is for a second time a fuel rod explode
rise and not knowing how widespread the waves may come >> we are told that the u.s. expects japan to ask for assistance from the military. the navy is not sitting around waiting for a formal request. they mobilized the ready groups that include the carriers and some 2,000 marines on the ships. quite frankly at least one of the ships, the uss blue ridge is in singapore started loading relief supplies on board in preparation for departure sometime tomorrow morning. this is enroute to japan. the uss tor tuga is loading uplanding craft that could be used to carry humanitarian relief and the marines on to shore where they are sorely needed. the uss ronald reagan group is only in that direction. one of the most important thing was to determine what kind of damage and what injury and most of the base are located in southern japan. the tsunami itself, there were no deaths or injured reported among personnel and damage to u.s. facilities was only minor. now the concentration is on preparing for the massive humanitarian relief needed for the people in that northern area of japan. >> i wante
personnel to help the japan response overall than any other country, so far it's 148 >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. our lead story tonight a live report coming up from japan in just a moment. the unfolding disaster there and coming up the battle ground that must not be ignored right here in the united states. if you thought governor scott walker of wisconsin was bad, wait until you see what governor john kasich of ohio is doing when it comes to picking up where walker left off. with a budget that would cut funds to schools. here's a new one for you. and even children's hospitals. how nice of them. the second front of the war on the middle class well under way. plus the very latest from wisconsin. >>> it's wednesday morning in japan and the brave souls of that country are trying to prevent the world's worst serious nuclear accident since chernobyl from becoming even a bigger disaster. at this hour the numbers are staggering. the number of confirmed dead, well over 3,000, but at least 10,000 are feared missing. almost 7,000 confirmed missing
allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but even if power is restored it is not clear if the cooling pumps will work. meanwhile, the japanese govern
bus accident but first coverage on the disaster in japan as there are new and alarming numbers from japan. japanese broadcaster nhk is reporting that at least 9500 people are unaccounted for in one port town. the death toll officially stands at 9500 in one devastated town. help is on the way for survivors stranded. the first wave of troops has begun arriving. the japanese government has declared states of emergency at two power plants after their units lost cooling abilities. officials say the reactor with stood the blast and the radiation levels have actually gone down. let's go now to tokyo. what are you seeing where you are? >> reporter: things seem to be resuming. a lot of the clean up, what little clean up was done. that however is clearly not the case to the northeast part of the country which remains in complete devastation. some places have been completely wiped out by that tsunami. we understand there are at least 4 million buildings that remain without power. basically every single road in and out of that part of the country has been cut off. survivors are lining up for fo
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
can understand that we are in the middle here in japan of what appears to be an escalating nuclear crisis and so they continue to have these rolling blackouts. we saw some power going back on behind me there at the tokyo tower, but understand that this area alone has 45 million people requiring power so they're trying to conserve as much as they can. because a quarter of the power here has been affected by the devastating earthquake and tsunami. now, you also mentioned the rescuers, the americans who were contaminated. they are pouring in rescuers from literally all around the world, at least ten different nations. they've deployed 100,000 military here in japan, and we have seen them coming in at the airport. the sad fact of the matter is that these search and rescue teams will find little to rescue, although there were a couple of amazing stories today. a baby and an elderly man pulled from the rubble after spending three nights in it. but, for the most part, what they are finding is this tremendous devastation. in one town alone, an estimated 1,000 people who were washed away in
. these pictures are from myoko, japan. we'll look at fresh pictures from those that witness and stood right there capturing the tsunami as it enveloped their surroundings. these are pictures that are hard to believe, but you're seeing them, and they're the proof of it all. good morning. i'm alex witt, and this is msnbc sunday. we have three big developments to tell you about in japan. first, the country's top government spokesman says a partial meltdown is most likely underway. the nuclear power plant reactor, about 170 miles north of tokyo. three reactors at that plant lost their cooling functions in the aftermath of an active earthquake and tsunami. meanwhile, massive vacs are underway for a 12 mile radius around those nuclear plants. more than 200,000 residents have been forced to leave their homes. one japanese official says nine people have already tested positive for high radiation levels on their skin and clothing. the number of dead continues to climb. officials say at least 1,200 people now have died. however, that number is expected to rise and potentially dramatically. >>> we are
away in tokyo a meeting of japan's prime minister at parliament turned to utter chaos. >> they're showing a city now on japanese television that looks like it's almost completely on fire. >> sparked fires in homes across the country and an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant shut down but no radiation escaped. closed airports. japan's famous bullet train shut down stranding hundreds of commuters. and then, a 23-foot wall of water crashed ashore. the tsunami sweeping away everything in its path. small boats smashed to bits. cars upturned and bobbing in the water. ships smashing against each other in part and a report of a ship with 100 people swept away. here's the latest on the devastation now. police in japan say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. japanese tv reports as many as 4 million buildings in tokyo and their surrounding suburbs without power. scientists now say this quake is the fifth largest in the world since 1900. and it's the largest ever recorded in japan. a little more than an hour ago the first waves hit the u.s. main
for help finding her sister who is a former english teacher in japan who returned to that country the day of the quake. ann found her and helped her reach her sister. >> do you have my sister? >> i have your sister. here she is. >> she is on the phone. are you okay? >> hi. >> are you okay? >> yeah. i'm totally okay. >> let's go right to tokyo now and msnbc's ciz jansing is there live. what's the primary concern now for people across the country? >> reporter: well, i think it's threefold. you have a humanitarian. you have an economic and you have an escalating nuclear crisis. there is nothing simple about what's happening here. and it is affecting not just that northeastern coastal area but really the entire country in a very profound way. now, let's start with the humanitarian crisis. you've been showing those pictures. they are absolutely heartbreaking, devastating. the one town that you showed in miyagi province where as many as a thousand people we heard earlier today washed up on the shore that had been bodies carried away in the tsunami. now officials there are saying they may have a
unbelievable stories of survival. those are coming out of japan. we'll share them with you. >>> plus, what do you do if you share the house speaker's trademarked orange glow? if you're like this guy, you become a john boehner impersonator and hope you can learn to cry on cue. more coming up later. >>> first, we want to get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. just four days after suffering its most devastating natural disaster ever, japan is now potentially facing the worst nuclear accident since chernobyl. in total, there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country. this crisis largely centers around one complex. it's about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. the crippled fukushima power plant. high levels of radiation leaked from the facility this morning after a third reactor was rocked by an explosion and a fourth caught fire. in a brief address to that nation today, the country's prime minister urged calm but said there was a "very high risk of further leakage." after an emergency cabinet meeting, the japanese cabinet warned 140,000 people living within roughly 1
. >>> overwhelmed. rescuers fight aftershocks as they dig for survivors, but the japan death toll is soaring. millions now are facing a fourth night without water, food or heat. and now a radiation alert, a second hydrogen explosion rocks the stricken nuclear plant. japanese official its screen evacuees for radiation, and the u.s. has had to move warships back. >>> meanwhile meltdown fears. a third reactor is losing its cooling capacity. officials say even under the best scenario, this isn't going to end any time soon. it's monday, march 14th, 2011. i'm chuck todd. savannah is on assignment. >>> also this morning, libya, gadhafi's troops tighten their grip renewing calls for a no-fly zone from some rebels. we'll talk to the pentagon's press secretary on the latest on that. >>> then there's politics. another short-term budget deal. 2012ers are target to act more like candidates and the sound bite now heard around the country. let's get to the rundown and we're going to start in japan and the latest on the tragedy there. the prime minister is calling it the country's worst crisis since world w
plant meltdown. northeast japan is reeling in the wake of the catastrophe. also this morning, a new york freeway is the scene of a horrific tour bus accident. at least 13 people are dead. a sober good morning to all of you. i'm alex witt. we're going to bring you more on that bus accident in just a bit. we continue with the disaster in japan. new alarming issues this morning. a japanese government official says there's no increase in radiation around a nuclear power plant after an explosion you're seeing on screen destroyed a building that housed a reactor. at the same time, officials say they fear a meltdown could be possible because two reactors at that plant have lost their cooling abilities. >>> help is on the way. today, the first wave of 50,000 troops began arriving by boats and helicopters to the hardest hit areas. japanese officials now say at least 574 people were killed in the earthquake in tsunami. however, local media reports say at least 1300 people may have died. powerful after shocks continue to shake the region. let's go live once again to tokyo. ian williams is there on
. hi, everybody. i'm thomas roberts. the watching and waiting continues in japan where the devastation continues, and the big question remains how dangerous is the radiation leaking from that country's nuclear plants in we're going to cover things from all angles. officials in japan say there's no plans to expand the evacuation around the crippled fukushima daiichi plant. there's now a crew of 300 people working in shifts trying desperately to contain the radiation. robert bazzell is nbc news chief science and environment correspondent, he joins us now. >> well, thomas, it's bad, because it's out of control. there has not been a major radiation leak yet outside of the workers inside -- the government today set only one of the workers had receive what could be considered a medically significant amount of radiation. so there has yet to be any significant rad yags leak, according to the officials. the problem is at least 4 of the 6 reactors are out of control in some way or another, and they could explode or melt or release large amounts of radiation into the environment, and that's the b
talked about those fires and being such a concern. >> well, right. japan has a large nuclear energy industry. they also have -- and there's a lot of concern in the country when they've had earthquakes about problems with it. they haven't had problems in general. so that was why he would -- the first thing he's going to say is, we haven't compromised our nuclear power plants. and i don't -- well, a tsunami going into a power plant can cause a lot of damage. but i don't know that they have any the areas at risk. it's pretty easy to map out before an event where your at-risk areas are. people would have known if they were in a tsunami danger zone before this event happened. the other thing, of course, is there is a magnitude 8.9 earthquake here beyond the tsunami. and that can damage a lot of facilities. >> talk to me about some of that damage. because we've seen some of the video out of tokyo. obviously that being a heavy populated area. it was a busy friday. it was 3:00 in the afternoon. and anyone that works in a city that's comparable to tokyo, take new york, for example, 3:00 on a
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
that people are picking up now who have been traveling around in japan, at least they were working at the nuclear facility, are minuscule. there is a lot of radiation at the site, but there's not a lot of radiation in the environment. there's very sensitive instruments to measure it, but it does not mean that the level is a health threat. now, the big concern right now is that here in tokyo, because this is now downwind, the winds have shifted. usually, they have been pushing the radiation out to sea. now the winds are aiming at tokyo. and 30 million people live in the greater tokyo area. and so if there were to be a massive release now, it's a big deal. so there's a lot of fear about that issue around here. >> and so, bob, given what the japanese government has said so far, i mean, they're telling people within a 19-mile radius to stay inside. our government is telling americans 50 miles away, no, get out. do the japanese people trust their government is going to protect them? >> reporter: well, some do and some don't, of course. and there's a lot of people who have already left t
in japan. a short time ago, the japanese government told the iaea that its engineers have been able to lay an external power cable at one of the reactors at the fukushima plant. now, this means they hope to reconnect power as soon as they are done spraying water on unit number three. earlier today, workers dumped thousands of gallons of water on the reactors by helicopter. the flights were stopped after the government realized they were not helping cool the unit down. they're still spraying water on reactors from the ground. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, exc
is taking care of your business by taking care of your employees. >>> alarming, new developments in japan today, new concerns about a meltdown at one of the damaged nuclear power plants and new numbers on how many people may have been exposed to radiation. >>> and take a look at this. new, amateur video that came in just a short time ago. can you believe that? it is from the moment that the tsunami hit. these pictures are from miyako, japan, and in a moment we'll show you video from people who sat there and witnessed the tsunami envelope their surroundings. it's hard to believe. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt and this is "msnbc sunday." we have three big developments to tell you about this morning in japan. the government's top spokesperson says a partial meltdown is most likely under way at a nuclear power plant about 170 miles north of tokyo. three reactors at that plant lost their cooling functions in the aftermath of the massive earthquake and tsunami. meanwhile, more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around those nuclear plants. japan's chief ca
. when an earthquake hit off the coast of japan today, it set off a tsunami that swept over rural and urban areas with devastating results. the 8.9 quake was the strongest in japanese history, one of the strongest anywhere on record ever. we've got the latest from japan and from experts here in america. the u.s. is offering to help with rescue and air lift operations. the quake led to tsunami warnings in hawaii, alaska and the west coast of the u.s., but there was no real damage. plus -- so that's what it was. here's what a wisconsin senate majority leader told fox news about the battle against unions out there. quote, if we win this battle and the money is not there under the auspices of the unions certainly what you're going to find is president obama is going to have a much more different time getting elected and winning the state of wisconsin. there you have it in black and white. look for democrats to use wisconsin as a rallying cry in 2012. also, gas lines from republicans. first haley barbour suggested president obama engineered price increases in order to get americans to
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
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